About Japan, A teacher's resource

members.

Members include online registrants as well as authors and editors invited to participate directly by Japan Society. Visitors are required to register in order to use the community features of the site. Member profiles can include biographical information and can be used to track and update individual contributions. This section can also be used as a tool to locate individuals who have similar interests or who are working in similar educational fields and settings.

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About Japan Editors

The materials published by the editors are developed through a collaborative process involving Japan Studies specialists, K-12 teachers, teacher educators, and Japan Society staff. For lessons and units, leading scholars specializing in the topic under consideration initially define the most essential learning goals related to the topic, draft introductory background information, and offer suggestions of appropriate teaching materials, resources for teachers, and teaching ideas. After this initial work, K-12 teachers collaborate in designing the lessons, including revising goals to make sure that they are age appropriate and devising and revising teaching ideas in a manner that would work in their own classrooms. Once the materials are public, the editorial board actively seeks input from all members and, as appropriate, integrates suggestions into the body of the materials. The editors also continually enhance lessons and other areas of the site.

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Robert Fish


I am director of Education and Lecture Programs at Japan Society. Previously, I was an assistant professor of Japanese history at Indiana State University, and have also taught high school social studies at Tenafly High School in New Jersey. My research focuses on the history of childhood in modern Japan, and the current manuscript I am working on addresses the history of "mixed-blood" orphans in postwar Japan. One main goal of my current work is to help improve the teaching of Japan in the PreK-12 classsroom.

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Victoria Moller


My areas of interest include Japanese art and craft, as well as elementary and early childhood education.

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William Tsutsui


Bill Tsutsui is chair of the Department of History and executive director of the Confucius Institute at the University of Kansas. A specialist in the business, economic, and cultural history of twentieth-century Japan, he holds degrees from Harvard, Oxford, and Princeton Universities. He is the author of Banking Policy in Japan: American Efforts at Reform During the Occupation (Routledge, 1988); Manufacturing Ideology: Scientific Management in Twentieth-Century Japan (Princeton University Press, 1998); and Godzilla on My Mind: Fifty Years of the King of Monsters (Palgrave, 2004). He is the editor of Banking in Japan (Routledge, 1999); A Companion to Japanese History (Blackwell, 2007); and (with Michiko Ito) In Godzilla's Footsteps: Japanese Pop Culture Icons on the Global Stage (Palgrave, 2006). He received the 1997 Newcomen Society Award for Excellence in Business History Research and Writing, the 2000 John Whitney Hall Prize (for best book on Japan or Korea published in 1998) of the Association for Asian Studies, and the 2005 William Rockhill Nelson Award for non-fiction. He is currently conducting research on the enviromental history of modern Japan and the globalization of Japanese popular culture since World War II. He has served as president of the Kansas State Historical Society and as program chair of the Kansas Humanities Council. He is also director of the Kansas Consortium for Teaching about Asia, which has offered professional development seminars on East Asian history and culture for K-12 teachers for the past eight years.

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Patricia Isoldi

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randy kaminsky

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Anthony Rau

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Kristin Fraga

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Elizabeth Rice

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ieman elzoghby

elementary school social studies teacher. Teaching for @ 10 years

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Additional support is provided by The Norinchukin Foundation, Inc., Chris A. Wachenheim, Jon T. Hutcheson, and Joshua S. Levine and Nozomi Terao.
 
About Japan: A Teacher’s Resource
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