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  • Futenma

    Resource

    Resources about Futenma.

  • Changes in Japan's Foreign Policy: US Military Presence

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    Two experts debate the necessity of a large military presence in Okinawa and the importance of the United States to view the security alliance with Japan with a knowledge of both history and the current political situation of East Asia.

  • Japan in the News

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    Recent stories involving Japan of potential interest to educators

  • It is possible that they will run away together

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    Ideals and realities differed as often in Japan’s dynamic, premodern villages as they did in the world of the governing samurai. One thing that set villages apart, however, was the social impact of “improper” behavior, because the small populations and intense daily interactions of rural life meant that actions rarely could be kept anonymous. What happened in one family had an impact on everyone. For this reason, most villages had well developed mechanisms for dealing with disputes and disruptive behavior.

  • Home Rule in Korea?

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    Hundreds of thousands of Koreans rose in protest against Japan’s harsh colonial control on March 1, 1919, sparking demonstrations and conflicts in which more than 7,000 died and more than 45,000 were arrested. In response, the Japanese government appointed a new governor, Saitō Makoto, and ushered in a softer policy intended to be more sensitive to Korean interests without giving up control of the country. Evidence of the new policy came in Saitō’s public relations campaign, shown in this English-language article, intended to convince both the Koreans and the rest of the world of Japan’s determination to bring civilization to Korea.

  • Speeches to Young Man

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    Japan was hit hard by the Great Depression, and while it recovered more quickly than most of the Western powers did, the economic disaster had a profound impact on the Japanese psyche. When Western nations imposed protectionist tariffs and cut back on the purchase of Japanese goods, people like Hashimoto Kingorō, one of the founders of the ultranationalist Cherry Blossom Society, concluded that Japan was being unfairly shut out of world markets. Like-minded officials decided that the time had come for Japan to develop its own autarkic (self-sufficient) economic empire, so that it would not be dependent on an unfriendly Western economic system. And that would entail the control of more territory. Paralleling the economic concerns was popular resentment of the American decision in the Immigration Act of 1924 to prohibit all Japanese (and Chinese) from immigrating to the United States.

  • Great disturbances in Tokyo

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    This time they were in opposition to what citizens regarded as insufficient gains at the Portsmouth Conference that ended the war, and this time they turned violent. The war with Russia had dwarfed that with China, and while Japan won, the victory was less decisive—a fact that most citizens did not fully grasp because of the nationalistic tone of the press’s coverage during the war. Japan won a great deal at the negotiating table, including the Russian holdings in the Liaodong Peninsula of Manchuria that had been so controversial in the earlier war. But when Japan did not receive an indemnity, tens of thousands demonstrated for three days, burning scores of police stations and street cars, destroying pro-government newspaper offices, and causing 17 deaths.

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